The clearest blue

by Paul Maharg on 30/04/2016

The banner photo was taken earlier this month on Beinn an Dothaidh, above Bridge of Orchy, looking north across Loch Tulla to Stob Ghobhar, with the great whaleback of Beinn Nevis in the distance, across Rannoch.  Amazingly clear weather, great day climbing with Euan.  And in shadow of cornice and icefall that luminous blue, at once intimate and distant, and you know climbing will be perfect.

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Emerging Legal Education, our Ashgate book series on legal education, is now a Routledge series, following the merging of Ashgate Publishing and Gower Books into the Taylor and Francis Group, which in turn is a division of the giant Informa Plc.  A few glitches with books not rendering properly on the web page but I’m sure a global conglomerate publisher like T&F, with its massive revenues accrued from academic journal publishing, will sort it out…  While it goes without saying that as series editors, Meera, Beth and I think all the publications in the series are important contributions to legal educational theory and/or practice, we’re especially pleased with the last two publications, and for these reasons…

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Materialism and Legal Pluralism

by Paul Maharg on 22/04/2016

To the ANU College of Law Moot Court couple of days back to hear a lecture by Margaret Davies on Materialism and Legal Pluralism.  Abstract:

Legal pluralism can be understood geographically, discursively, sociologically, and as the plural consciousness and performances of legal subjects. It pays attention to the bottom-up and material conditions of law production. In trying to unravel some of these complexities, this lecture will also add to them by expanding the meaning and reach of law, to address the human body, the earth, and the world of objects.

I found it a very suggestive lecture, quite fascinating.

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Law Teacher Special Issue author nominated for a Webby Award

April 15, 2016

One of our authors in The Law Teacher special issue, Dan Jackson, is director of the NuLawLab which has produced software, NuLawMaps, that’s been nominated for a Webby Award, under the Law category.  Dan discusses his centre’s approach to legal education in his journal article, arguing that coupling technology instruction with training in human-centered design approaches offers legal educators a […]

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Disintermediation in law schools

April 14, 2016

Now in Canberra, at the National Law Reform Conference being held in ANU, 14-15 April.  Some great papers.  This morning I heard my colleague Vivien Holmes on her work on legal ethics, and embedding it within legal education; Justine Rogers on teamwork, presenting both sides of the debate, massively referenced, and raising key issues about the […]

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Learning / Technology in Legal Education: Special Issue of The Law Teacher

April 13, 2016

The first 2016 issue of The Law Teacher is now out. It’s a Special Issue on legal education and technology, guest-edited by me, with an Editorial and six articles on the past, present and future use of technology in law schools.

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Supports Open Access

November 10, 2015

All three of my regular readers will know this blog’s commitment Open Access, not just in education (OER), not just in collaboration between institutions, but in Open Access to research as well.  Lingua is one of the foremost journals in the Linguistics community, and published by Elsevier.  Laughably, the website sports the label Supports Open Access.  The […]

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The experiential photograph

September 29, 2015

A couple of folk have asked about the banner photos.  The one above, an autumn photo, was taken at the weekend on the Cuillins, Skye, near the cloud line, from the shoulder of Sron na Ciche, on our way to climb Sgurr Dearg and An Stac (in English, the rather grandiosely-named Inaccessible Pinnacle).  You’re looking at […]

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Digital Research Literacies, part 2

August 4, 2015

‘Literacies’ might suggest a basic set of competencies, one that’s highly teleological, but I mean the very opposite of it — a complex unbounded, uncertain collection of capabilities, awarenesses and moral positions.  Actually that’s really what literacy is in any case — a hugely complex process.  As an adult education tutor many years ago I […]

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Digital research literacies

July 30, 2015

Before I head off back to Scotland, am giving a session to ANU College of Law staff on digital research literacies.  I’ve given it in various forms in various places (twice at IALS), but it’s never the same session.  What’s fascinating for me is to watch how the ERA process is beginning to shape around […]

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